Life after registration

By Anton L. Delgado — When Dwayne Daughtry meets someone for the first time, it rarely starts with an introduction.

“Every day I feel like I’m reliving my crime all over again,” Daughtry said. “When people talk to me, the first thing they want to hear about is what I did — not what I do or who I am.”

In 2011, Daughtry was charged with sexual battery — the only misdemeanor that leads to being listed as a sex offender. Other offenses that end with registration range from possession of child pornography to rape.

The federal government requires law enforcement to make the personal information of an offender — name, race, sex, height, weight, address, birthday, scars, marks, tattoos, eye and hair color — public.

Daughtry and more than 25,600 people are listed on North Carolina’s Sex Offender Registry. In 2019, just over 1,300 registrants were added, which is more than any other year in the last two decades.

 

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Dwayne Daughtry

Dwayne is NCRSOL's Executive Director.

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